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Reg. 390 
Procedure for inspection of installed boilers

General Instruction

a) It is essential to have every part of the boiler, that is accessible, open and properly prepared for examination, internally and externally. All boilers have openings through which an examination may be made and which for operation are closed; all such parts shall be opened whether for access to water surfaces, or heater surfaces. In cooling a boiler down for inspection or repairs, the water should not be withdrawn until the setting is sufficiently cooled to avoid damage to the boiler and when possible allowed to cool down naturally. It is not necessary, in order to comply with ordinary prudence, to remove insulation material, masonry, or fixed parts of the boiler, unless defects or deterioration peculiar to certain types or inaccessible parts of boilers are suspected and where there is moisture or vapor showing through the covering should be removed at once and a complete investigation made. Particular attention should be paid to the external parts of boilers in the way of seating blocks, especially when the situation is damp. Saddle tanks and engine fittings of locomotive type boilers should be removed to facilitate the inspection of the parts underneath at the first inspection, and at any reasonable period afterwards if the Inspector cannot otherwise satisfy himself as to the condition of those parts. Upon sufficient visible evidence or suspicion due to age or other causes, every effort shall be made to discover the true condition, even to the removal of insulating material, masonry or fixed parts of a boiler. Sometimes drilling or cutting away of parts is justifiable and necessary to positively determine this condition.


The Inspector should, whenever the size permits, go inside it and make a thorough inspection of all its internal parts. Before doing so, he should of course, satisfy himself that proper provision has been made for disconnecting the boiler from any other boiler under steam. Should he find that proper provision for disconnection has not been made or that the boiler has not been properly cleaned or scaled, or that is unreasonably hot, he should decline to proceed with the inspection and should report the facts to the Chief Inspector for orders. When a boiler is of such a size or its construction is such that the Inspector cannot go inside it, there should be sufficient sight holes or hand-holes provided to enable him to see the principal internal parts; if any important part of a boiler is so constructed that the Inspector cannot examine it, he should report the facts to the Chief Inspector for orders.

In the case of forced circulation and forced flow boilers which are not accessible to close visual inspection, the Inspector should, besides thorough examination, ensure by the flow of water that proper circulation is maintained through all sections of the water circuits.
 
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